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Traffic Monsoon – Scam Review Part 3

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The well-known Ponzi scheme Traffic Monsoon is back.

This time, con artists are hoping to steal money from new people by using cryptocurrency.

The first Traffic Monsoon was run from a.COM domain, but the one in 2022 is run from “trafficmonsoon.net.”

On June 6, 2022, a private person signed up for the.NET domain.

The new Traffic Monsoon website is based on an HTML Codex freemium template:

The Ponzi scheme is easy to understand: investors put $1 into adpacks, and one adpack is worth 1300 shares. Daily returns are based on how many shares an affiliate has put money into:

If you buy between 1,300 and 3,000 shares, you’ll get 10 cents per day. If you buy between 3,000 and 12,000 shares, you’ll get 25 cents per day. If you buy between 12,000 and 93,150 shares, you’ll get $1 per day. If you buy between 93,151 and 517,500 shares, you’ll get $4.50 per day. If you buy between 517,501 and 2,794,500 shares, you’ll get $25 per day. If you
To get their money back, investors have to click on ads every day. Affiliates who invest their own money earn a 21% commission on those funds.

Like the first Traffic Monsoon, the new version is not an MLM scheme.

In contrast to the original Traffic Monsoon, the new version asks for investments in both USD and a number of cryptocurrencies.

The original Traffic Monsoon was a $207 million Ponzi scheme that was shut down by the SEC in 2016.

The man who started the band Traffic Monsoon, Charles Scoville (on the right), is in prison because he tried to sexually abuse a child. Also, he has been charged with wire fraud and tax fraud.

Scoville’s life is pretty much over, so it’s unlikely that he’s behind the new Traffic Monsoon.

On Traffic Monsoon’s website, you can find a random home address in the Netherlands. I thought this made no sense.

Since Traffic Monsoon’s reboot didn’t take much work, it’s probably just a random person looking to make a quick buck.

Whoever is in charge of Traffic Monsoon is running the Ponzi scheme with the help of a sketchy Telegram group:

People often think of Telegram when they think of online fraud.

I don’t think this will go anywhere, but we’ll let you know if anything big happens.

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